Jeep Cherokee (XJ): Extended idle switch-pcm input. Oxygen sensor-pcm input. Ignition circuit sense-pcm input

Jeep Cherokee (XJ) 1984 - 2001 Service Manual > Fuel system > Fuel injection system > Description and operation > Extended idle switch-pcm input. Oxygen sensor-pcm input. Ignition circuit sense-pcm input

Extended idle switch-pcm input

DESCRIPTION

USED ONLY WITH OPTIONAL POLICE PACKAGE WHEN EQUIPPED WITH A 4.0L ENGINE: The extended idle switch is a rocker-type switch mounted to the instrument panel.

OPERATION

The extended idle switch is used to raise the engine idle speed to approximately 1000 rpm by supplying a ground circuit to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). This idle speed control can only be operated when the shifter is in either the Park or Neutral position.

Oxygen sensor-pcm input

DESCRIPTION

The Oxygen Sensors (O2S) are attached to, and protrude into the vehicle exhaust system. Depending on the emission package, the vehicle may contain either 2 or 4 sensors. On non-California emissions packages, 2 sensors are used: upstream (referred to as 1/1) and downstream (referred to as 1/2). On California emissions packages, 4 sensors are used: 2 upstream (referred to as 1/1 and 2/1) and 2 downstream (referred to as 1/2 and 2/2).

OPERATION

An O2 sensor is a galvanic battery that provides the PCM with a voltage signal (0-1 volt) inversely proportional to the amount of oxygen in the exhaust.

In other words, if the oxygen content is low, the voltage output is high; if the oxygen content is high the output voltage is low. The PCM uses this information to adjust injector pulse-width to achieve the 14.7-to-1 air/fuel ratio necessary for proper engine operation and to control emissions.

An O2 sensor must have a source of oxygen from outside of the exhaust stream for comparison. Current O2 sensors receive their fresh oxygen (outside air) supply through the wire harness. This is why it is important to never solder an O2 sensor connector, or pack the connector with grease.

Four wires (circuits) are used on each O2 sensor: a 12-volt feed circuit for the sensor heating element; a ground circuit for the heater element; a low-noise sensor return circuit to the PCM, and an input circuit from the sensor back to the PCM to detect sensor operation.

Oxygen Sensor Heaters/Heater Relays: On a certain non-California emission package, the heaters on both sensors are fed battery voltage from the ASD relay which is controlled by the PCM. Refer to ASD relay for more information. On another non-California emission package, the heaters on both sensors are fed battery voltage from the two O2S heater relays. The O2S relays are also controlled by the PCM. On the California emission package, the heaters on all 4 sensors are fed battery voltage from the two O2S Heater Relays.

The O2 sensor uses a Positive Thermal Co-efficient (PTC) heater element. As temperature increases, resistance increases. At ambient temperatures around 70F, the resistance of the heating element is approximately 6 ohms. As the sensor's temperature increases, resistance in the heater element increases.

This allows the heater to maintain the optimum operating temperature of approximately 930-1100F (500-600 C). Although the sensors operate the same, there are physical differences, due to the environment that they operate in, that keep them from being interchangeable.

Maintaining correct sensor temperature at all times allows the system to enter into closed loop operation sooner. Also, it allows the system to remain in closed loop operation during periods of extended idle.

In Closed Loop operation, the PCM monitors certain O2 sensor input(s) along with other inputs, and adjusts the injector pulse width accordingly. During Open Loop operation, the PCM ignores the O2 sensor input. The PCM adjusts injector pulse width based on preprogrammed (fixed) values and inputs from other sensors.

Upstream Sensor (Non-California Emissions): The upstream O2S sensor (1/1 sensor) is located in the exhaust downpipe before the catalytic convertor.

It provides an input voltage to the PCM. The input tells the PCM the oxygen content of the exhaust gas.

The PCM uses this information to fine tune fuel delivery to maintain the correct oxygen content at the downstream oxygen sensor. The PCM will change the air/fuel ratio until the upstream sensor inputs a voltage that the PCM has determined will make the downstream sensor output (oxygen content) correct.

The upstream oxygen sensor also provides an input to determine catalyst efficiency.

Downstream Sensor (Non-California Emissions): The downstream heated oxygen sensor (1/2 sensor) is located near the outlet end of the catalytic convertor. The downstream sensor is also used to determine the correct air fuel ratio. As the oxygen content changes at the downstream the PCM calculates how much air fuel ratio change is required. The PCM then looks at the upstream oxygen sensor voltage and changes fuel delivery until the upstream sensor voltage changes enough to correct the downstream sensor voltage (oxygen content).

The downstream oxygen sensor also provides an input to determine catalyst efficiency.

Upstream Sensors (California Emissions): Two upstream sensors are used (1/1 and 2/1). The 1/1 sensor is the first sensor to receive exhaust gases from the #1 cylinder. Both of the upstream O2S sensors are located in the exhaust manifold just before the mini-catalytic convertors. They provide an input voltage to the PCM. The input tells the PCM the oxygen content of the exhaust gas. The PCM uses this information to fine tune fuel delivery to maintain the correct oxygen content at the downstream oxygen sensors. The PCM will change the air/fuel ratio until the upstream sensors input a voltage that the PCM has determined will make the downstream sensors output (oxygen content) correct.

The upstream oxygen sensors also provide an input to determine mini-catalyst efficiency.

Downstream Sensors (California Emissions): Two downstream sensors are used (1/2 and 2/2). The downstream sensors are located in the exhaust downpipes just after the mini-catalytic convertors. The downstream is also used to determine the correct air fuel ratio. As the oxygen content changes at the downstream the PCM calculates how much air fuel ratio change is required. The PCM then looks at the upstream oxygen sensor voltage and changes fuel delivery until the upstream sensor voltage changes enough to correct the downstream sensor voltage (oxygen content).

The downstream oxygen sensors also provide an input to determine mini-catalyst efficiency.

Ignition circuit sense-pcm input

DESCRIPTION

This circuit ties the ignition switch to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM).

OPERATION

The ignition circuit sense input tells the PCM the ignition switch has energized the ignition circuit.

Battery voltage is also supplied to the PCM through the ignition switch when the ignition is in the RUN or START position. This is referred to as the "ignition sense" circuit and is used to "wake up" the PCM. Voltage on the ignition input can be as low as 6 volts and the PCM will still function. Voltage is supplied to this circuit to power the PCM's 8-volt regulator and to allow the PCM to perform fuel, ignition and emissions control functions. The battery voltage on this line is supplied to the 8-volt regulator which then passes on a power-up supply to the 5-volt regulator.

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