Jeep Cherokee (XJ): Fluid. Torque converter. Oil pump

Fluid

NOTE: Refer to the maintenance schedules in Group 0, Lubrication and Maintenance for the recommended maintenance (fluid/filter change) intervals for this transmission.

NOTE: Refer to Service Procedures in this group for fluid level checking procedures.

DESCRIPTION

Mopart Dexron IIE/Mercon is the recommended fluid for the AW-4 automatic transmissions.

Fig. 3 First/Second/Third/Reverse Gear Components
Fig. 3 First/Second/Third/Reverse Gear Components

1 - 2ND COAST BRAKE
2 - DIRECT CLUTCH
3 - FORWARD CLUTCH
4 - FRONT PLANETARY RING GEAR
5 - SECOND BRAKE
6 - FIRST/REVERSE BRAKE
7 - REAR PLANETARY CARRIER
8 - REAR PLANETARY RING GEAR
9 - OUTPUT SHAFT
10 - FRONT & REAR PLANETARY SUN GEAR
11 - ONE-WAY CLUTCH NO. 2
12 - ONE-WAY CLUTCH NO. 1
13 - FRONT PLANETARY CARRIER
14 - INPUT SHAFT

Fig. 4 Fourth Gear Overdrive Components
Fig. 4 Fourth Gear Overdrive Components

1 - CLUTCH
2 - BRAKE
3 - RING GEAR
4 - PLANETARY CARRIER
5 - SUN GEAR
6 - ONE-WAY CLUTCH
7 - INPUT SHAFT

Dexron II fluid IS NOT recommended. Clutch chatter can result from the use of improper fluid.

Mopart Dexron IIE/Mercon automatic transmission fluid when new is red in color. The ATF is dyed red so it can be identified from other fluids used in the vehicle such as engine oil or antifreeze. The red color is not permanent and is not an indicator of fluid condition.

As the vehicle is driven, the ATF will begin to look darker in color and may eventually become brown. This is normal. A dark brown/black fluid accompanied with a burnt odor and/or deterioration in shift quality may indicate fluid deterioration or transmission component failure.

FLUID ADDITIVES

DaimlerChrysler strongly recommends against the addition of any fluids to the transmission, other than those automatic transmission fluids listed above.

Exceptions to this policy are the use of special dyes to aid in detecting fluid leaks.

Various "special" additives and supplements exist that claim to improve shift feel and/or quality. These additives and others also claim to improve converter clutch operation and inhibit overheating, oxidation, varnish, and sludge. These claims have not been supported to the satisfaction of DaimlerChrysler and these additives must not be used. The use of transmission "sealers" should also be avoided, since they may adversely affect the integrity of transmission seals.

OPERATION

The automatic transmission fluid is selected based upon several qualities. The fluid must provide a high level of protection for the internal components by providing a lubricating film between adjacent metal components. The fluid must also be thermally stable so that it can maintain a consistent viscosity through a large temperature range. If the viscosity stays constant through the temperature range of operation, transmission operation and shift feel will remain consistent.

Transmission fluid must also be a good conductor of heat. The fluid must absorb heat from the internal transmission components and transfer that heat to the transmission case.

Torque converter

DESCRIPTION

The torque converter (Fig. 5) is a hydraulic device that couples the engine crankshaft to the transmission.

The torque converter consists of an outer shell with an internal turbine, a stator, an overrunning clutch, an impeller and an electronically applied converter clutch. The converter clutch provides reduced engine speed and greater fuel economy when engaged. Clutch engagement also provides reduced transmission fluid temperatures. Torque converter clutch engagement occurs in second gear in 1-2 position; third gear in 3 position and third and fourth gear in D position. The torque converter hub drives the transmission oil (fluid) pump.

The torque converter is a sealed, welded unit that is not repairable and is serviced as an assembly.

CAUTION: The torque converter must be replaced if a transmission failure resulted in large amounts of metal or fiber contamination in the fluid. If the fluid is contaminated, flush the fluid cooler and lines.

Fig. 5 Torque Converter Assembly
Fig. 5 Torque Converter Assembly

1 - TURBINE
2 - IMPELLER
3 - HUB
4 - STATOR
5 - CONVERTER CLUTCH DISC
6 - DRIVE PLATE

IMPELLER

The impeller (Fig. 6) is an integral part of the converter housing. The impeller consists of curved vanes placed radially along the inside of the housing on the transmission side of the converter. As the converter housing is rotated by the engine, so is the impeller, because they are one in the same and are the driving member of the system.

Fig. 6 Impeller
Fig. 6 Impeller

1 - ENGINE FLEXPLATE
2 - OIL FLOW FROM IMPELLER SECTION INTO TURBINE SECTION
3 - IMPELLER VANES AND COVER ARE INTEGRAL
4 - ENGINE ROTATION
5 - ENGINE ROTATION

TURBINE

The turbine (Fig. 7) is the output, or driven, member of the converter. The turbine is mounted within the housing opposite the impeller, but is not mounted to the housing. The input shaft is inserted through the center of the impeller and splined into the turbine.

The design of the turbine is similar to the impeller, except the blades of the turbine are curved in the opposite direction.

Fig. 7 Turbine
Fig. 7 Turbine

1 - TURBINE VANE
2 - ENGINE ROTATION
3 - INPUT SHAFT
4 - PORTION OF TORQUE CONVERTER COVER
5 - ENGINE ROTATION
6 - OIL FLOW WITHIN TURBINE SECTION

STATOR

The stator assembly (Fig. 8) is mounted on a stationary shaft which is an integral part of the oil pump. The stator also contains an over-running clutch. The stator is located between the impeller and turbine within the torque converter case (Fig. 9).

The over-running clutch of the stator allows the stator to rotate only in a clockwise direction.

Fig. 8 Stator Components
Fig. 8 Stator Components

1 - CAM (OUTER RACE)
2 - ROLLER
3 - SPRING
4 - INNER RACE

TORQUE CONVERTER CLUTCH (TCC)

The TCC (Fig. 10) was installed to improve the efficiency of the torque converter that is lost to the slippage of the fluid coupling. Although the fluid coupling provides smooth, shock-free power transfer, it is natural for all fluid couplings to slip. If the impeller and turbine were mechanically locked together, a zero slippage condition could be obtained. A hydraulic piston was added to the turbine, and a friction material was added to the inside of the impeller housing to provide this mechanical lock-up.

OPERATION

The converter impeller (Fig. 11) (driving member), which is integral to the converter housing and bolted to the engine drive plate, rotates at engine speed.

The converter turbine (driven member), which reacts from fluid pressure generated by the impeller, rotates and turns the transmission input shaft.

TURBINE

As the fluid that was put into motion by the impeller blades strikes the blades of the turbine, some of the energy and rotational force is transferred into the turbine and the input shaft. This causes both of them (turbine and input shaft) to rotate in a clockwise direction following the impeller. As the fluid is leaving the trailing edges of the turbine's vanes it continues in a "hindering" direction back toward the impeller. If the fluid is not redirected before it strikes the impeller, it will strike the impeller in such a direction that it would tend to slow it down.

Fig. 9 Stator Location
Fig. 9 Stator Location

1 - STATOR
2 - IMPELLER
3 - FLUID FLOW
4 - TURBINE

Fig. 10 Torque Converter Clutch (TCC)
Fig. 10 Torque Converter Clutch (TCC)

1 - IMPELLER FRONT COVER
2 - THRUST WASHER ASSEMBLY
3 - IMPELLER
4 - STATOR
5 - TURBINE
6 - FRICTION DISC

Fig. 11 Torque Converter Fluid Operation
Fig. 11 Torque Converter Fluid Operation

1 - APPLY PRESSURE
2 - THE PISTON MOVES SLIGHTLY FORWARD
3 - RELEASE PRESSURE
4 - THE PISTON MOVES SLIGHTLY REARWARD

STATOR

Torque multiplication is achieved by locking the clutch to its shaft (Fig. 12). Under stall conditions (the turbine is stationary), the oil leaving the turbine vanes strikes the face of the stator vanes and tries to rotate them in a counterclockwise direction. When this happens the over-running clutch of the stator locks and holds the stator from rotating. With the stator locked, the oil strikes the stator vanes and is redirected into a "helping" direction before it enters the impeller. This circulation of oil from impeller to turbine, turbine to stator, and stator to impeller, can produce a maximum torque multiplication of about 2.2:1. As the turbine begins to match the speed of the impeller, the fluid that was hitting the stator in such as way as to cause it to lock-up is no longer doing so.

In this condition of operation, the stator begins to free wheel and the converter acts as a fluid coupling.

Fig. 12 Stator Operation
Fig. 12 Stator Operation

1 - DIRECTION STATOR WILL FREE WHEEL DUE TO OIL PUSHING ON BACKSIDE OF VANES
2 - FRONT OF ENGINE
3 - INCREASED ANGLE AS OIL STRIKES VANES
4 - DIRECTION STATOR IS LOCKED UP DUE TO OIL PUSHING AGAINST STATOR VANES

TORQUE CONVERTER CLUTCH (TCC)

In a standard torque converter, the impeller and turbine are rotating at about the same speed and the stator is freewheeling, providing no torque multiplication.

By applying the turbine's piston to the impeller's friction material, a total converter engagement can be obtained. The result of this engagement is a direct 1:1 mechanical link between the engine and the transmission.

The engagement and disengagement of the TCC are automatic and controlled by the Transmission Control Module (TCM). Inputs that determine clutch engagement are: coolant temperature, vehicle speed and throttle position. Clutch engagement is controlled by transmission valve body solenoid number three and by the converter clutch relay valve. The solenoid channels line pressure to the clutch through the relay valve at clutch engagement speeds.

Oil pump

DESCRIPTION

The oil pump (Fig. 13) is located in the pump housing inside the bell housing of the transmission case.

The oil pump consists of an inner and outer gear, a housing, and a cover that also serves as the reaction shaft support.

OPERATION

As the torque converter rotates, the converter hub rotates the inner and outer gears. As the gears rotate, the clearance between the gear teeth increases in the crescent area, and creates a suction at the inlet side of the pump. This suction draws fluid through the pump inlet from the oil pan. As the clearance between the gear teeth in the crescent area decreases, it forces pressurized fluid into the pump outlet and to the valve body.

Fig. 13 Oil Pump Assembly
Fig. 13 Oil Pump Assembly

1 - PUMP SEAL
2 - PUMP BODY
3 - STATOR SHAFT
4 - SEAL RINGS
5 - GEAR
6 - O-RING

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